30 Day Vegan Challenge – Day 22 – Eat Plants, Eat Fibre

Keep Things Moving With Fibre: Only in Plants Never in Animals

4bc98b7c9d24d2de8293f3ac731abf98-994cfb48456e223324103b0d6d76f2feFibre exists only in plants. There is no fibre in meat, dairy or eggs. Zero. Zilch. Zip.

Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, 30 Day Vegan Challenge

If you are eating a wholefood, plant-based diet you are probably eating around the recommended daily intake of fibre (about 30 grams) or more. I think there is nobody who disagrees that a fibre rich diet is essential for long term good health, yet surprisingly few people appear to get even the recommended daily amount.

There isn’t really a lot to say about Day 22. We need a fibre-rich diet to maintain good health. I eat a reasonably varied wholefood (most of the time) plant-based, vegan diet. and this gives me more daily fibre than I need. (I know I checked on Cronometer.)

Oatmeal and blueberries are high in soluble fibre.
Oatmeal and blueberries are high in soluble fibre.

I have definitely noticed a difference since moving to a completely plant-based diet. And that is all I am going to say about it. My grandmother would be relieved to know that at least some of her pointless Victorian-era etiquette lecturing on lady-like behaviour somehow managed to stick.

Vegetable are a great source of fibre along with all their other amazing health benefits.
Vegetable are a great source of fibre along with all their other amazing health benefits.

Dr Gregor, of course, has a short essay on fibre in relation to disease prevention that includes links to his other writings and videos on the topic. If you weren’t already convinced that a primarily plant-based diet was the way to go I strongly suggest you read this.

Legumes are a powerhouse source of soluble fibre.
Legumes are a powerhouse source of soluble fibre.

A clear, concise, easy to read article on fibre and its role in the prevention of some of our leading lifestyle diseases is provided by the Harvard School of Pubic Health – Fibre: Start Roughing it!  The article is based on their decades of research into nutrition and public health.  According to the article a fibre-rich diet plays a significant role in the prevention of colon cancer, heart disease, type-2 diabetes, diverticular disease  (inflammation of the intestine in older people) and constipation.

One question raised by such studies is whether fiber itself protects against heart disease and diabetes, or whether the disease-fighting benefits accrue from the nutrient-rich whole grain package. A recent meta-analysis of seven major studies showed that cardiovascular disease (heart attack, stroke, or the need for a procedure to bypass or open a clogged artery) was 21 percent less likely in people who ate 2.5 or more servings of whole grain foods a day compared with those who ate less than 2 servings a week. (12) Another meta-analysis of several large studies, including more than 700,000 men and women, found that eating an extra 2 servings of whole grains a day decreased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 percent. (13) So to protect against heart disease and diabetes, perhaps the best advice is to choose whole grain, high-fiber foods at most meals.

Fibre: Start Roughing it!, The Nutrition Source, Harvard School of Public Health

High intake of dietary fiber has been linked to a lower risk of heart disease in a number of large studies that followed people for many years. Fibre: Start Roughing it!
High intake of dietary fiber has been linked to a lower risk of heart disease in a number of large studies that followed people for many years.
Fibre: Start Roughing it!
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